Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences

Erling Skjalgson gt. 1
N-7491Trondheim, Norway


Project Leader

Marit Sæbø Indredavik

Trondheim, Norway

Phone number: +47 7355 15 10

E-mail Contact


Project Staff

Kari Risnes

Trondheim, Norway

Phone number: +47 7359 75 29

E-mail Contact

Kari Anne I. Evensen

Trondheim, Norway

Phone number: +47 977 33 635

E-mail Contact

Asta Håberg, Professor

Trondheim, Norway

Phone number: +47 7355 13 52

E-mail Contact

Pål Richard Romundstad

Trondheim, Norway

Phone number: +47 994 64 909

E-mail Contact

Ann-Mari Brubakk

Trondheim, Norway

Phone number: +47 994 58 229

E-mail Contact

Signe Opdahl

Trondheim, Norway

Phone number: +47 7359 75 69

E-mail Contact


Institution Portrait

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) is Norway’s largest university with more than 38000 students, 9 faculties and 56 departments. Yearly, more than 300 PhD degrees are awarded within the fields of technology, science, medicine, arts, humanities and social sciences.

The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences has a renowned professional education program in Medicine and Master programs in health disciplines. Teaching and research activities are performed in close collaboration with St. Olavs Hospital (https://stolav.no/en), Trondheim University Hospital. The research is targeting three main areas: 1) Health surveys, biobanks and registers as a means to achieve better public health. 2) Medical technology targeting cost-effective development and use of technology for diagnostics and treatment from a global perspective. 3) Translational research aiming to strengthen the ties between basic research, patient-related research and patient treatment.

The faculty has a long tradition in multi-disciplinary collaboration across departments and professions in order to combine expertise in basic and clinical research, including epidemiology and medical technology. The research on life-course epidemiology using registry data is well consolidated; particularly related to long-term consequences of adverse perinatal events, preterm birth, preeclampsia and assisted reproduction technology. The faculty conducts one of the world`s largest population-based longitudinal studies (HUNT http://www.ntnu.edu/hunt) with focus on public health and risk factors for disease. This includes genetic population research and bio banking facilities in international frontline.

The RECAP project is rooted at Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children’s and Women’s Health (LBK http://www.ntnu.edu/lbk), in collaboration with Department of Mental Health, Department of Public Health and Nursing, and Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science. The research at LBK includes clinical, basic and translational research. Relevant to RECAP, a specific focus is devoted to follow-up related to low birth weight and neurodevelopmental outcome, including mental and somatic health, cognitive and motor outcome. Brain development is examined at different ages by cerebral MRI. Clinical cohorts are presently followed for more than 30 years with low attrition rates, and younger cohorts receiving recent medical treatments are recruited. Modern epidemiological methods, particularly family design studies and complex registry studies are used to investigate long-term outcome in individuals born preterm or with low birth weight.